About your Search

20131028
20131105
STATION
ALJAZAM 23
CSPAN 13
CNNW 9
COM 9
CSPAN2 9
KQED (PBS) 7
KPIX (CBS) 6
WJZ (CBS) 6
KCSM (PBS) 5
KTVU (FOX) 5
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 3
WHUT (Howard University Television) 3
LINKTV 2
MSNBC 2
MSNBCW 2
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 112
Search Results 100 to 111 of about 112
intelligence agencies to protect the very sources and methods they need to ensure our national security. of it not resolved completely in the late 'out. it was not resolved by the patriot act. i don't think fundamentally that part will be resolved. it's a very difficult issue. and fortunately for us, terrorist organizations and organized crime organizations throughout the world have not formed the allegiance that we thought they might. thankfully. and in term of cyber crimes, some of the groupser. traiting cyber crime they haven't the leader, the gangsters are old fashioned and autocratic, some cases just plain stupid when it comes to the potential use of the global financial market. stock market and other means other than violence. so that's the interesting thing about them. as long as they are stuck in the world of trying to resolve to the knuckle dragging, racketeering meths that are -- methods tried and true for the last 75 years in organized crime, that's a benefit for us. as we used to say -- as i used to say when john goty and kevin get together, lookout. in other words a leading
, his former head of the national security agency and the cia. sunday night were tv talk shows on c-span radio. it brought tears of public service by c-span. abc this week, 2 p.m. fox news sunday. 3 p.m. the state of union and at 4 p.m. eastern time facing nation from cbs. listen to them all on c-span radio. and 90.1 fm here in the washington dc area across the country on xm satellite radio channel 120 you can download a free app for your smart phone or listen online. at c-span radio.org. >> john foster dulles had recently died when that super airport out in chantilly, virginia was being rebuilt. president eisenhower immediately made announced at the airport would be called the dulles airport. there was pushed back from others and finally the decision was made to name it after dulles. you can still see the film clip of kennedy opening the airport with eisenhower there and allen dulles there and he pulled back a curtain and behind the curtain is his giant bust of john foster dulles. that bust stands in the middle of this big airport. so in to see it while i was writing this book. i c
for our intelligence agencies to protect the very sources and methods that they need to ensure our national security. it was not resolved completely it was not resolved by the patriot act. i do not think it will ever be completely result come a it is a very difficult issue. fortunately for us, terrorist organizations, and organized crime organizations around the world have not formed the allegiance they -- that we thought they might. in terms of cyber crime, some of the groups perpetrate chewing -- groups arbitrating the cyber the stock markets, have been using means other than violence, that is the interesting thing about them. as long as they are stuck in their world of trying to results the methodst to they have always use, that is a benefit for us. words, a leading gangster, or organized crime group, if they team up with level a hackers, and use their ability to penetrate commuter -- computer networks and databases, when they are able to do that and then commit extortion banks, the amazon's, and security, then we will see the jeopardy to our engine that drives our economy. case
and the national security agency according to a government spokesperson. germany and france are they wanted to go to the u.s. to sign a no spy deal by the end of the year. the leaders have warned a lack of trust could harm the fight against terrorism as well as the merkel's phone was bugged. the nsa claims they have monitored millions of phone calls by both germany and france citizens. this is steve from windham, connecticut on the independent line. caller: i think general alexander should resign. gamedy who follows the spy ought to be able to read "the "the guardian," and new york times." the spying isn't about germany or france. host: what you mean the spying is about ourselves? well, i as an american when i go to europe or to asia, i represent united states in a way, you know? i don't want to be known as the guy who sneaks into his wife's handbag. it is really about ourselves as a people. newspaper and the read what these people are doing? through mrs. to go merkel's handbag? host: that is steve from windham, connecticut, re- freezing our question from this morning. it said should be re-think
phone calls by millions of europeans. the national security agency director alexander testified yesterday on capitol hill that european spy agencies shared those records with the u.s. >> to be perfectly clear this is not information we collected on european citizens. it represents information that we and our nato allies have collected in defense of our countries and in support of military operations. >> at another hearing, national sbel intelligence directors was asked about monitoring allies. he said american friends spy on the united states. >> some of this reminds me of the classic movie casablanca. there's gambling going on here. it's the same thing. >>> john miller is here. >> good morning. clapper used the same one i used monday. either we think a like or he's a viewer. >> which is it? >> in the name of full discloe disclosure disclosure, he was my old boss before this job. >> let's get to the point. we do it to them; they do it to us. is there something special aboutnyabout germany and chancellor merkel that makes them want to pay more attention to her? >>
allegations of national security agency has been spying on them. early early i spoke with the former u.s. ambassador to nato about whether the reaction is for their people or if it is personal. >> i don't think we should discount the personal feeling of violation that someone like chancellor merkel has. when she realizes it's her very own cell phone that she has in her hand that's being listened to. i can see that there is a personnelment to this and a genuine reaction, but from the establishments in european governments a lot of this is for public con zukauskus. the publics are upset so the government needs to show that they are upset. and it's also convenient for the government to his deflect everything towards blaming the united states rather than having anyone scrutinize what they do. >> let's zero in on chancellor merkel an al annal an ali. how much is going to need to be done for her to be satisfied? what has to happen? what left of the transparency -- does she want to know what do you have? toll at that time? >> i wouldn't say that each and every communication is asking for too
security agency is now under fire here at home. >> both the president and congress are considering changes that would limit the n.s.a.'s sweeping ability to collect intelligence. >> words like constraint, transparency and increased oversight are now used when talking about the future of the nation's spy agency. >> a bipartisan group of lawmakers is expected to introduce a bill that could curtail the n.s.a.'s powers to indiscriminately collect personal information. >> the u.s.a. freedom act is authored by patrick lahee. it would provide restrictions against who the n.s.a. could target and require the government to delete information it collects accidentally, more aggressively than it does now. the bill has a dozen co sponsors in the senate and 70 in the house. meanwhile, senator dianne feinstein, the democratic head of the senate intelligence committee, who has been a staunch defender of the n.s.a. is criticizing the agencies monitoring of world leaders like german chancellor angina merkel. in a statement, she says: >> the white house says president obama was not aware of just how extensive
. with a it worth it? >> absolutely not. look, the national security agency, i depended upon it for my entire career. it's got brilliant information when it comes to counterterrorism. but when you're listening into european leaders, it's not worth it. and especially when you let someone like edward snowed den put documents out. the europeans are going to back away. wee need them for counterterrorism. >> you said on cnn "newsroom" yesterday, you said, we'll see people -- and you said quote, backing off from washington. give me a sense of what you think that will look like and elaborate on what you mean. >> look, let's take britt i can't be. gchq, that's their national security agency. it's quite remarkable organization. they're very good. if they should come up with a very secret interacceptive, they're going to have second thoughts about calling washington and sharing it. they just will. they're worried about all the information we're leaking from wikileaks and on. it's truly a culture of -- that can't be sustained. >> so there's one thing to be very upset, feel violated, et cetera. but it's another
of the morning. the white house is reviewing all u.s. surveillance programs after reports national security agency was spying on some 35 world leaders and the top senator on the senate intelligence committee says he is totally opposed to that surveillance and that data collection will not continue. cnn's chief national correspondent john king is here to talk more about all of this. it's pretty interesting where things have gotten with this spying controversy, john. the white house is saying they're going to review the spying policy of foreign leaders but dianne feinstein, she is not happy. she says she's been kept in the dark and wants a further review that she's going to spreer heea. >> dianne feinstein was a defender of the nsa, saying most of the intelligence gathering was necessary. but she defended most of the practices. now she's not happy. she doesn't think she's getting straight answers from the agency and sometimes the white house. she's promising tougher scrutiny. that's a signal to the administration, significantly in this latest case she put out a statement saying the administra
in support of national security and defense, and that is their exclusive mission, and the most -- well the executive order actually signed by president reagan which defines the roles, and missions of all the intelligence agencies makes it perfectly clear what their mission is. that's exactly what they do. >> and what their authority is. >> let's listen to what some of what general alexander had to say yesterday. >> there ma not been a mass casualty here in the u.s. since 2001. that's not by luck. they didn't stop hating us. they didn't say that they were going to just forget this. they continued to try. >> he seems almost upset by these leaks. to what extent do you think u.s. intelligence has been weakened out all? >> obviously there's been enormous dabbling. this is an activity, intelligence activities, normally con ducked in secret, in fact highly secret and by making clear some of our capabilities and some of what we've done causes people on the other side to not communicate the way they normally would communicate, to take other actions, and it, you know, it provides them with ammun
security agency, the nsa, has secretly tapped into those company's servers overseas. though the nsa denies the report, it's the latest reason for americans to question their privacy and the broad reach of our intelligence community. we'll get more from cnn's chief national security correspondent jim sciutto. >> reporter: explained in this simple hand sketched drawing, complete with a smiley face, maybe a newly disclosed way the nsa is monitoring the internet. "the washington post" citing documents stolen and released by edward snowden reports the intelligence agency has tapped into the communications link such as undersea cables connecting yahoo! and google data centers around the world and because those links are overseas, they can do so without any oversight from the u.s. government. the nsa chief delivered a partial denial. >> this is not nsa breaking into any databases. it would be illegal for us to do that. >> reporter: as did a written statement from nsa to cnn saying "the assertion that we collect vast quantities of u.s. persons' data from this type of collection is not true" but th
with the security agencies and intelligence agencies of other nations, of allied nations. i'm not going to get into the specific alleged activities, intelligence activities, of the united states or our allies. we're obviously more broadly engaged in a review as i discussed at length yesterday of our intelligence gathering activities, mindful of the fact that because of the explosion in our technological capacities , we need to look at and make sure that we are not just gathering intelligence because we can, but we're gathering it because we need it specifically and that review is under way at the president's direction and will be completed by the end of the year. >> one of the things that officials say of the review is the surveillance of allied heads of state. is the administration's plan to conduct this review and tell the public of its outcomes all at once or is it possible that we could learn in the coming days or a shorter time frame of the decision on that specific program ahead of speed, surveillance? >> i think generally speaking you should expect it upon conclusion of the review. we w
Search Results 100 to 111 of about 112